Publication Abstract

Authors: Ayanian JZ, Zaslavsky AM, Guadagnoli E, Fuchs CS, Yost KJ, Creech CM, Cress RD, O'Connor LC, West DW, Wright WE

Title: Patients' perceptions of quality of care for colorectal cancer by race, ethnicity, and language.

Journal: J Clin Oncol 23(27):6576-86

Date: 2005 Sep 20

Abstract: PURPOSE: To identify opportunities for improving care, we evaluated patients' perceptions of the quality of their cancer care by race, ethnicity, and language. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We surveyed a population-based cohort of 1,067 patients with colorectal cancer in northern California approximately 9 months after diagnosis. Adjusting for clinical and demographic factors, mean problem scores were analyzed on a 100-point scale for six domains of care. RESULTS: Mean problem scores were highest for health information (47.8), followed by treatment information (32.3), psychosocial care (31.7), coordination of care (21.3), confidence in providers (13.1), and access to cancer care (12.7). In adjusted comparisons with white patients, African American patients reported more problems with coordination of care (difference, 9.8; P < .001), psychosocial care (difference, 7.2; P = .03), access to care (difference, 6.6; P = .03), and health information (difference, 12.5; P < .001). Asian/Pacific Islander patients reported more problems than did white patients with coordination of care (difference, 13.2; P < .001), access to care (difference, 15.5; P < .001), and health information (difference, 12.6; P = .004). Hispanic patients tended to report more problems with coordination of care (difference, 4.4; P = .06), access to care (difference, 5.8; P = .08), and treatment information (difference, 7.0; P = .06). Non-English-speaking white patients reported more problems than other white patients with coordination of care (difference, 21.9; P < .001), psychosocial care (difference, 16.1; P = .009), access to care (difference, 19.8; P = .003), and treatment information (difference, 17.8; P = .002). Non-English-speaking Hispanic patients reported more problems than other Hispanic patients with confidence in providers (difference, 16.9; P = .01). CONCLUSION: Efforts to improve patients' experiences with cancer care should address disparities by race, ethnicity, and language, particularly in coordination of care, access to care, and the provision of relevant information.