Publication Abstract

Authors: Leyva B, Nguyen AB, Allen JD, Taplin SH, Moser RP

Title: Is religiosity associated with cancer screening? Results from a national survey.

Journal: J Relig Health 54(3):998-1013

Date: 2015 Jun

Abstract: This study examined the following: (1) relationships between religiosity-as measured by religious service attendance-and screening for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers; (2) the potential mediating role of social support; and (3) the potential moderating effect of race/ethnicity. Statistical analyses showed that religiosity was associated with greater utilization of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening. Social support fully mediated the relationship between religiosity and Pap screening, and partially mediated the relationship between religiosity and colorectal screening, but had no effect on the relationship between religiosity and mammography screening. Race/ethnicity moderated the relationship between religiosity and social support in the cervical cancer screening model, such that the positive association between religiosity and social support was stronger for non-Hispanic Blacks than it was for non-Hispanic Whites. These findings have implications for the role of social networks in health promotion and can inform cancer screening interventions in faith-based settings.