Interagency Consortium to Promote Health Economics Research on Cancer (HEROiC)

The interagency consortium to promote health economics research on cancer (HEROiC) brings together the National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Cancer Society, the LIVESTRONG Foundation, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to develop research resources, improve analytic methods, and enhance coordination and collaboration among researchers and partner organizations. The ultimate aim of these activities is to reduce the economic burden of cancer and cost-related barriers to care for cancer survivors in the United States.

HEROiC enhances strategies to improve access to high-quality cancer care and reduce the economic burden of cancer in the United States by:

  • Maximizing utility of research to inform clinical practice and policy;
  • Building capacity for high-quality descriptive, evaluative, modeling and comparative research; and
  • Creating and supporting the mechanisms and infrastructure needed for research translation and dissemination.

HEROiC strives to:

  • Raise awareness of the importance of the economic burden of cancer from the perspectives of patients and their families, employers, health insurers, and society overall. Aspects of economic burden include costs associated with receipt of medical care, productivity losses due to cancer, late and lasting effects of treatment, and premature mortality;
  • Develop and enhance research resources for estimating the economic burden of cancer at the national, state, and local levels;
  • Quantify the economic burden of cancer at the national, state, and local levels from the perspectives of patients and their families, employers, health insurers, and society overall;
  • Stimulate research and program evaluation related to the effects of public policies, health care settings, health service delivery, and health care financing and insurance structures;
  • Encourage use of economic theories to improve understanding of individual, health care provider, and organizational behaviors related to the receipt of high-quality cancer care;
  • Work with partners to integrate measures of the economic burden of cancer into existing research studies and routine clinical practice; and
  • Provide national and international leadership to accelerate dissemination and implementation of evidence-informed practice and policy.

Resources

Commonly used surveys and databases for health economics research on cancer include:

Relevant reports and publications include:

A number of population-based surveys and databases that can be leveraged to estimate and model the economic burden of cancer are described in the following publications:

  • Lerro CC, Stein KD, Smith T, Virgo KS. A systematic review of large-scale surveys of cancer survivors conducted in North America, 2000-2011. J Cancer Surviv 2012 Jun;6(2):115-45. Review. [View AbstractExternal Web Site Policy]
  • Lund JL, Yabroff KR, Ibuka Y, Russell LB, Barnett PG, Lipscomb J, Lawrenc e WF, Brown ML. Inventory of data sources for estimating health care costs in the United States. Med Care 2009 Jul;47(7 Suppl 1):S127-42. doi: 10.1097/MLR.0b013e3181a55c3e. [View AbstractExternal Web Site Policy]